Kingdom Classification Table

Kingdom
Archaebacteria
Eubacteria
Animal
Plant
Fungi
Protista
Cell Type
Prokaryotic
Prokaryotic
Eukaryotic
Eukaryotic
Eukaryotic
Eukaryotic
Cell Parts

Cell wall not containing peptidoglycan, Single chromosome

Cell wall containing peptidoglycan ,Single chromosome

No cell wall, Nucleus, and membrane bound organelles

Cell wall containing cellulose, Nucleus and membrane bound organelles

Cell wall containing chitin, Nucleus, and membrane bound organelles.

Some contain a cell wall, All contain a nucleus and membrane bound organelles.

Body type
Unicellular
Unicellular
Multicellular
Multicellular
Multicellular

Some multicellular, most unicellular.

Nutrition

Heterotrophic and autotrophic

Heterotrophic and autotrophic

Heterotrophic

Autotrophic

Heterotrophic

Heterotrophic and autotrophic

Examples

Methanogens

E. coli

Man, dogs, worms

Ferns, grasses, mosses

Mushrooms, yeast,

Ameba, Paramecium, Euglena.

Linnaeus' Seven Taxa of classification:

1. Kingdom : The most general of the seven taxa. At present there are 6 kingdoms.

2. Phylum : Phyla (plural). Each kingdom is subdivided into small more specific groups called phyla. These organisms contain all the kingdom characteristics plus some other specific ones that set each phylum apart form the others in the kingdom.

3. Class : Each phylum is subdivided into smaller groups called class. The Class contains phylum characteristics plus specific characteristics that separate one class from another in the phylum.

4. Order : Each class is subdivided into smaller groups called orders. Orders contain class characteristics plus specific characteristics that separate one order from another in the class.

5. Family : Each order is subdivided into smaller groups called families. Families contain order characteristics plus specific characteristics that separate one family from another in the order.

6. Genus : Each family is subdivided into smaller groups called genera. The genus contains the family characteristics plus specific characteristics that separate one genus from another in the family.

7. Species : Each genus is subdivided into smaller groups called species. The species contain genus characteristics plus specific characteristics that separate one species from another in that genus. The species is the most specific taxon in the system.

Scientific Name of an Organism:

A scientific name of an organism contains two parts. The first name is the genus name and the second name is the species name. There are some simple rules in writing a scientific name:

a). The first letter of the Genus name must be capitalized.

b). The first letter of the species name is not capitalized.

c). Both names must be underlined or italicized.